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haxx:projects:agro:wedge2018 [2018/05/16 13:21]
wedge [May 2nd, 2018]
haxx:projects:agro:wedge2018 [2018/05/28 10:32] (current)
wedge [May 5th, 2018]
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 And some volunteers from last year (chive), and what looks to be lamb's quarters (wild spinach). And some volunteers from last year (chive), and what looks to be lamb's quarters (wild spinach).
 +
 +====May 16th, 2018====
 +A while since updating, although that isn't to say I haven'​t been taking pictures (just haven'​t been timely about getting them updated and entries posted!)
 +
 +I'm posting this on the 28th. Amazing that only 12 days have passed (not even 2 weeks), and yet it feels like an eternity. So this is even interesting for me to see growth, what has changed, etc. on a broader scale, vs. the day-to-day details I deal with.
 +
 +So here we go:
 +
 +===greenhouse===
 +
 +The greenhouse has proven to be quite the viable investment for my agricultural endeavors. Be it rains or lingering cool temperatures at night (thinking back around the 16th), it has effectively allowed me to commence my growing season much earlier into May (versus JUST getting started at the start of June, as I usually do).
 +
 +Although I haven'​t been able to equip the greenhouse shelves as I would have originally liked, it still has worked out amazingly (especially to keep some useful items outside, nearer to the plants, like watering cans and the like).
 +
 +Left side of greenhouse:
 +
 +{{ :​haxx:​projects:​agro:​20180516-view1.jpg |}}
 +
 +Right side of greenhouse:
 +
 +{{ :​haxx:​projects:​agro:​20180516-view2.jpg |}}
 +
 +===other enclosure===
 +
 +My microfarm (4 tiers of planters), is also doing well, and benefits from its greenhouse covering (warding off excessive water and cold nighttime temperatures):​
 +
 +{{ :​haxx:​projects:​agro:​20180516-view3.jpg |}}
 +{{ :​haxx:​projects:​agro:​20180516-view4.jpg |}}
 +
 +===fully exposed===
 +
 +And a snapshot of the continuing growth of one of my mulberry bushes and my thriving black currant bush:
 +
 +{{ :​haxx:​projects:​agro:​20180516-mulberry.jpg |}}
 +{{ :​haxx:​projects:​agro:​20180516-currant.jpg |}}
 +
 +====May 28th, 2018====
 +
 +As I mentioned in the May 16th post, really only a relatively short time has passed, yet it has seemed to be nothing short of full-out summer for me. On May 17th, I commenced my summer off-grid adventures (basically, camping out and living with said plants).
 +
 +Growth has only continued to explode, and my fights with various pests has commenced.
 +
 +It would seem that the greenhouse enclosures are NOT successful in warding off slugs. I still suffer heavy losses from slug attacks (predominantly my lettuce, purslane, and less-so broccoli).
 +
 +Although, it HAS been successful in warding off the chipmunks, so I have not only seen 3-4 strawberries ripen, I have have enjoyed unique access to them (versus last year, where I'd see an almost ripe strawberry, come back the next day and see it nibbled halfway).
 +
 +I've started to try out some anti-slug approaches, like lining various pots or even individual plants with copper wire (I read they may have an aversion to coming in contact with it). This has apparently worked enough to allow some new purslane attempts to last far longer than the previous ones. Although I cannot say it is entirely successful... I lost at least 1-2 more lettuce plants due to slugs (to be fair, they could have slid on via other means).
 +
 +So, some pictures:
 +
 +===purslane===
 +
 +Still small, but they'​ve survived for days, a record. I am hoping they remain free of slug encounters, as purslane is one of my favorite plants to grow:
 +
 +{{ :​haxx:​projects:​agro:​20180528-purslane.jpg |}}
 +
 +===semi-exposed===
 +
 +On known non-rainy days, I've started leaving select berry bushes out in the full environment. To the left is the very thriving blackberry bush (although its companion strawberries have all but died out).
 +
 +On the right is one of my blueberry bushes, which is in questionable health (it suffers from irrigation problems, and has gotten overly soaked possibly one too many times... various branches have a slight mold on them). YET: all its companion strawberry plants are very much THRIVING:
 +
 +{{ :​haxx:​projects:​agro:​20180528-view0.jpg |}}
 +
 +===greenhouse (left view)===
 +
 +I picked up 2 additional planters (mini-size, so I CAN place them on the greenhouse shelving), and have started to populate them.
 +
 +{{ :​haxx:​projects:​agro:​20180528-view1.jpg |}}
 +
 +Top row (from right to left):
 +
 +  * vegetable mix (kit I bought at Wegmans)
 +    * generally thriving. It has had a few slug encounters, but seems to be coming back each time.
 +  * blueberry bush.
 +    * probably the least bushy of my new blueberry bushes, but also showing no signs of suffering any maladies. Companion strawberry plants also doing well.
 +  * mixed window planter. The significant growth on the right edge is parsley. Also present are some still developing geranium (flower) sprouts, asparagus (very thin), and I believe a small broccoli and pepper sprouts.
 +
 +Middle row:
 +
 +  * one of my mini planters. Currently sporting (from right to left):
 +    * parsley
 +    * wild (transplanted) strawberry, that is thriving (it was touch and go the first couple days)
 +    * sweet bell pepper
 +
 +Ground level:
 +  * background/​raised planter:
 +    * front left is a dandelion
 +    * to its right is a parsley
 +    * then a purple potato
 +    * then some '​volunteer'​
 +  * front-left planter:
 +    * bottom left: lamb's quarters (wild spinach)
 +    * just above it: purple potato
 +    * to its right: peas
 +  * front-right planter:
 +    * more of the same, just in different orders (lamb'​s quarters are bigger, in bottom right)
 +
 +===greenhouse (right view)===
 +
 +{{ :​haxx:​projects:​agro:​20180528-view2.jpg |}}
 +
 +Top row (left to right):
 +
 +  * my other blueberry bush (both bush and companion strawberry plants thriving)
 +    * you can see 2 strawberry runners shooting off to the left. When they get long enough I hope to capture both of them in pots (the yellow pot to the left is waiting to catch one of the runners)
 +  * some unidentified but "​maybe"​ '​spanish mint' plant. (now in 2 pots)
 +
 +Middle row (left to right):
 +
 +  * the 2 blue pots are cucumber, both still doing well.
 +  * my other mini planter, with a bigger sweet pepper on the left, then a purslane, a couple more wild strawberry plants, and a dandelion-cousin.
 +
 +===tiered planter===
 +Next up:
 +
 +{{ :​haxx:​projects:​agro:​20180528-view3.jpg |}}
 +
 +For whatever reason, best growth has been in the top planter. The lower I go, the more die-off I've had (maybe sunlight, although maybe also first place where slugs attack). I also had drainage problems with the lowest planter.
 +
 +Top planter has thriving lettuce, broccoli, purslane.
 +
 +Second planter has broccoli, pepper sprouts, flax, and a pea plant.
 +
 +Also of note in this second planter:
 +
 +{{ :​haxx:​projects:​agro:​20180528-mushroom.jpg |}}
 +
 +Fungal growth! While this isn't likely an edible mushroom (it ain't a medicinal mushroom, and it certainly isn't a psychedelic),​ it IS quite valuable to overall growth. The mycelium taking up residence in the soil processes it and actually eliminates various things. Like worms help, mycelium growth augments the immune system of plants, allowing them to grow.
 +
 +Some plants have stronger natural defenses, and can grow almost anywhere (kale, chard, broccoli, flax, purslane, spinach). These plants tend to have more oxalates.
 +
 +If you've ever wondered why some plants don't take as easily as others, presence of beneficial mycelium growth may be the factor. We're not actually seeing the mycelium (the main organism, that exists entirely beneath the soil), we are seeing the fruiting body (the mushroom). So while the mushroom isn't edible, it is marking the presence of a very beneficial organism that will help the other plants grow. Nice.
 +
 +Third planter has a bigger broccoli and sweet pepper (in back), and two very thriving strawberry plants in the front. In fact, these 2 strawberry plants have produced all my strawberries I've picked so far (you can see a reddening one in the left plant).
 +
 +Bottom planter I will be attempting a replant.
 +
 +And raised (orange) planter off to the right has another purple potato plant, and is one of the locations of my still-living purslane (off to the potato'​s left).
 +
 +I likely will start some additional seeds in the coming days. My swiss chard has largely survived, but has yet to really thrive like the broccoli... it didn't suffer from slugs last year, so I have high hopes to get some good chard growth this year too.
 +
 +Mulberry and currant bushes continue to thrive, I'll try to get some updated pictures. One of my black raspberry bushes got nibbled on. But now so many of the wild red raspberry bushes are growing.
haxx/projects/agro/wedge2018.txt · Last modified: 2018/05/28 10:32 by wedge